Esquire Magazine Starting Something New

?

Sounding like something from the distant future, Esquire magazine are celebrating the 75th anniversary of the publication by printing 100,000 special editions of its October 2008 magazine, by using a cover made from electronic paper. The cover will feature moving images and words that will move around the page, with the first ever e-paper advertisement on pages one and two.

?

“The electronic display used on the Esquire magazine cover will be an electrophoretic flexible display,” said Jennifer Colegrove, Ph.D., an iSuppli analyst. “This is very significant, since electrophoretic display has been used on e-books, such as Sony eReader, Amazon Kindle, etc. It’s also used on mobile phones, etc.,” she said, noting this will be the first time such a display has been used as a magazine cover.

?

?The technology is based on the principle of electrophoresis. Particles dispersed in a fluid generally carry an electric surface charge. E Ink’s technology utilizes millions of microcapsules – each roughly the thickness of a human hair or thinner – containing white and black particles,? explained Sriram Peruvemba, vice president of marketing at E Ink.

?

?When an electrical voltage is transmitted across the surface of the paper – really a plastic film laminated to a layer of circuitry – the white or black particles suspended in a liquid carrier medium rise to the surface. Which color rises depends on the polarity of the voltage,? he continued.

?

“That is the basic principle. When the black particles go to the top, you get a dark image. The white particles go on top, so you get the white,” he said.

?

The microcapsules in their carrier medium can be printed using existing screen printing processes onto an array of surfaces including glass, plastic, fabric and paper.

?

“The material used is the exact same material used to make paper white and the black particles we used are the same thing that makes ink dark. These are not exotic but are everyday products. So, we essentially are trying to replace paper with the same materials used in paper and ink with an electronic product,” Peruvemba said.

?

Colegrove reckons that due to the technology’s relatively environmentally friendly nature and low cost, she expects flexible electrophoretic displays used for e-books and e-paper will grow to a US$1.7 billion industry by 2013.

?

“The cost for low-resolution type electronic paper is not very high, but the cost for high-resolution type uses a TFT (thin film transistor) backplane, which triggers high cost. But we do see the cost declining in the next couple of years,” she explained.

?

“The cost can be offset by its benefits: save papers, get fast news. Also, the light weight, thinness, ruggedness, low power consumption and sunlight readability of flexible electrophoretic displays are very suitable for electronic newspaper applications,” Colegrove added.

?

Connected to a power source, the paper will retain the image for up to one year, Peruvemba pointed out.

?

“You can update [the display] and it will have many years of life to it. In electronic newspapers, you can read the newspaper, put it down, and the image is retained. No battery power is used and when you come back it is still on the same ‘page,’” he concluded.

Be Sociable, Share!

One thought on “Esquire Magazine Starting Something New”

  1. Pingback: Esquire Magazine Goes G33k | Chutneytech | UK Technology News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>